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A set of eight late Victorian dessert glasses for jellies, syllabubs, custards etc. These small glasses first became popular duing the Georgian period and were used for (often liquid) palette cleansers served between banquet courses. The glasses were stacked on a glass tazza to make an attractive display. After a lull in the mid 19th century they again became popular with the late Victorians where they were used for the same purpose and expanded in use for more dessert types. This set is well made from good quality glass and hand cut with an elongated lens design. The stems are of capstan form and the feet have had the pontil scars ground and polished out. Quite rare to find a matching set of eight from this period.

Condition


All in good order with minor wear.



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Two excellent quality very late Victorian or Edwardian period stirrup glasses. They are in the same design with scale cuts and etched fruiting vines but are a little different in size. They were made for riding where the foot would just had been a nuisance and they wuold usually had been held in a leather case. They have very short stems with knops to aid grip. The cutting and etching style is in the manner of James Powell (later Whitefriars glass) and it is quite possible they came from this factory. Great pieces for the collector.

Condition


Both good for period with slight wear. One has some fritting and tiny nibbles around the end of the knop possibly from the grinding process during production.



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Description


An early to mid 19th century Georgian or William IV small glass jug. It has quite a wide pouring spout and the handle is applied and finished at the bottom in the late Georgian style. The shape is very much transitional between the Georgian and Victorian and it has attractive etching of foliate forms. The pontil has been ground and polished out and the item is of course hand made. The glass type is soda, a very pretty little jug.

Condition


Period wear with minor scuffs and scratches to the body, more so to the base as expected.



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A late 19th century Victorian period small glass tankard by Sowerby. It is press moulded and has a starburst base with the Sowerby logo in the center. The body has a portrait of Queen Victoria etched using acid and it is marked 'Jubilee 1887'. The top also has 'Lewis's' etched above the Queen's portrait and there is a further name in script for 'Harry Kendrick'. I can't find the significance of the names for this item, but the 'Harry Kendrick' appears to be a personal dedication as it is in a different script.

Condition


Normal light period wear, minor scratches etc as expected. More wear to the base indicating it was used and has not been just an ornament. Moulding lines visible as expected for this period.



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A mid to late 19th century Victorian period half rummer. It was made in two parts with the foot and bowl being joined during production. Half rummers as the name suggests are simply smaller versions of rummers and would have been used for similar drinks from beer through water. This example is in soda glass and due to the higher than average quality would perhaps have been a domestic rather than tavern or pub example. The foot has the pontil scar ground and polished out.

Condition


Good order with just minor wear, well made for its type.



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Description


A late 19th century Victorian period half rummer. It was made in two parts with the foot and bowl being joined during production. Half rummers as the name suggests are simply smaller versions of rummers and would have been used for similar drinks from beer through water. This example is in soda glass and was likely made for a pub or tavern being tough and simply constructed. The underside of the foot has a gadget mark left over from the glass blowing process and shows as a 'T' spaed mark in the center of the foot.

Condition


Simply made and the foot is a little out of round from production. Air bubbles trapped in the glass as typical for soda glass. Minor wear.



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An early 19th century late Georgian period small drinking glass. It has a baluster shaped stem and a bell bowl cut with flutes over the lower two thirds. The foot is conical and the pontil scar has been ground and polished out. Glasses such as this were used for gin and other strong drinks and it may well have been intended for a hotel or higher quality inn. Despite being nearly 200 years old this type of glass is still ok to use and they make great liqueur glasses.

Condition


Good for period, normal wear to the foot, light wear to bowl.



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Description


An early 19th century late Georgian period jelly glass. It has a long conical bowl with everted rim and the lower half of the bowl is cut with flutes. The bowl is connected to the stem with a knop and the foot is conical and has had the pontil scar ground and polished out. These glasses were popular during the 18th and early 19th century and again in the later 19th century for liquid type desserts such as syllabub or custards. The glasses would be stacked on tiers of tazza to make an attractive disply. These custards and syllabubs were often served as palette cleansers between courses.

Condition


Wear to the base as expected, body good with a few scratches.



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Description


An early 19th century late Georgian small drinking glass. It features a conical bowl with has flute cuts and a pronounced merese joint to the stem (increasing strength). The stem has an angular knops and the foot ins conical. The pontil scar has been largely removed although traces still remain. This type of glass would have been used for stronger drinks such as port and spirits and would have been multipurpose.

Condition


Good for period with light period wear.



Approx Dimensions


Height: 11 cm ( 4 3/8 inch )
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Description


A 19th century Victorian period small drinking glass with reduced capacity bowl. The bowl of the glass has thicker than average walls particularly near the base so you get less drink than you may have expected. They were used as toasting glasses (so you could keep going longer) but also at coaching stops which is where this example was probably employed. It allowed the coaching stop to increase their profits at the expense of the customer -and interesting comparison with todays motorway services! The size of this glass would have meant it was used for spirits such as brandy. The bowl on this example has broad hollow flute cutting and the stem is of baluster form. The foot is quite strudy and has a ground and polished pontil. It dates around 1870 and is far better made than the average coaching inn glass, they are usually fairly basic being utilitarian pieces.

Condition


Very good for period with very minor wear only. Slight trapped air bubbles in the glass from production.
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