0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (2)
     

Description

An early 19th century Georgian Regency of William IV period Bristol green wine glass. The bowl is of upright form and would be classed as an elongated rounded funnel. The baluster form stem has a cylindrical knop at the top and there is a basal collar linking the stem to the foot. The foot is conical and the pontil has been ground out in exagerrated form. It is made in English lead glass and has a nice form being different from the usual green examples.

Condition


Good order with minor wear. Despite the exuberent polishing of the pontil width wise there are still some (indented) traces of the scar to the underside.



Approx Dimensions


Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (2)
     

Description


A Georgian period Bristol Green wine glass dating around 1800. It is an English lead glass example and it has a conical foot with a ground and polished pontil. It is produced in two parts with the bowl and stem drawn together and the foot applied. It is almost a tulip shape, but the bowl doesn't in-curve at the rim. A good example and fine to use, they make good alternative white wine glasses.

Condition


Very minor wear only, a good example.



Approx Dimensions


Height: 12.9 cm ( 5 inch )
Read more

0 actions
+ expand

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (5)

Description


A set of six Stuart lead crystal glasses in the classic Glengarry cut. Traditionally this shape of glass was used for hock and white wine, but they also double as decent champagne or champagne cocktail glasses. They are a good weighty feel in the hand and of course of very good quality as expected from Stuart. Date wise they are probably mid 20th century as they have a few slight mineral inclusions which are usually absent in later examples and they don;t have the whiteness of post 80's pieces. Stuart England acid mark to the base of each

Condition


All in fine condition, probably spent their life in a cabinet.



Approx Dimensions

Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (4)
 

Description


A Victorian period high quality glass tazza dating around 1860. It is beautifully made with a quilt moulded dish having a cranberry rim which has lens cuts. The stem is hollow blown and slice cut and the applied foot has star cutting. As is usual for this period it does not carry the makers marks, but the style is very much that of the Richardsons glass factory. It would have been used for bon bons etc and would have been an expensive piece in its day.

Condition


Very good order, minor wear only, a lovely example.



Approx Dimensions


Height: 10.7 cm ( 4 1/4 inch )
Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (4)
 

Description


An 18th century English lead glass bowl with an applied blue glass rim. The bowl was mould blown to form the ribbing and the pontil is rough snapped. The bowl has been pulled into a waist to form the foot so it was produced using a single gather of glass (aside the rim of course). The rim has a lot of air bubbles and the back lighting in the images makes this almost look like glitter, there are also more than usual air bubbles in the main body. Date wise it is around 1770-1800. It was probably intended as a sugar or bon bon bowl as it's not really the right size or shape for a patty pan.

Condition


Aside quite a lot of small air bubble inclusions from production it is on good order with some wear to the foot as expected.



Approx Dimensions
Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (3)
   

Description


A late 19th or early 20th century colour twist liqueur glass. It loosely copies the Georgian style, but it would not be intended as a forgery, it just takes inspiration from early glasses. It is made of soda glass and may well be European mainland in origin. The stem is a double series with an outer pair of multi ply bands and central red spirals. The bowl has a thick base and this holds seven controlled air bubbles with one in the center and the others arranged around it. The stem has a top knop and the pontil scar has been left rough to the underside of the foot. The bowl capacity is limited so would suit neat spirits or liqueurs.

Condition


Minor period wear only, a good example.



Approx Dimensions
Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (4)
 

Description


A late 18th century Georgian period wine glass. This example has a diamond facet cut stem and the bowl is cut with an 'oxo' band, the foot is conical in form. It is made from English lead glass and dates around 1790. The pontil is rough snapped which is quite usual, the polishing of pontil scars began around the time of this glass so examples can be found with and without the rough pontil scar. This style of glass was used for wine, although the bowl size is tiny compared to what we used today, and there were a number of reasons for this. Firstly wine was expensive, but also drinking often tended to be done as rounds of toasts so you would drink the measure in one go. Also if you could afford wine and glasses like this you probably had servants to top up your glasses too!.

Collectors may also be interested to know that the Powell glassworks (Whitefriars) produced copies of this sytle of glass around 1900 and many are sold as Georgian in error. There are subtle differences such as stem thickness and glass colour to help identify them, so do take care when purchasing.

Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (5)

Description


A pair of late 19th or early 20th century opaque twist glasses. They are made loosely in the Georgian style, and these particular examples would not have been made to deceive collectors. They feature double series stems with two outer multi ply spirals and a central multi ply band which is twisted. The fillaments are very fine and are more in keeping with Venetian work than the Georgian English glasses. The bowls are of bell form and the bases of the bowls are thick and set with six controlled air bubbles around a central single air bubble. The bowl capacity is quite small so only really suited to liqueurs, but they were likely more made for decoration than for use. The pontils are rough snapped and they are mae from soda glass.

Condition


Both in good order with just light wear.



Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (4)
 

Description


A Georgian firing type glass dating around 1765. It is an English lead glass example and the pontil is rough snapped as you would expect for this period. It has a white opaque twist stem which is a double series with center lace twist and outer 15 ply spiral band. It also features a terraced foot and the bowl is of ogee form. The stem is thicker that a usual opaque twist so it can better withstand the rigours of use as a firing glass.

The term firing glass comes from the noise these glasses made when they were rapped on the table during rowdy bouts of toasting, often associated with masonic lodges and similar. The din was likened to musket fire, and the name stuck. Firing glasses will usually have thicker stems and especially feet so withstand the punishment.

This example has an air bubble to the bowl which is open to the inside of the bowl, so the price is reduced accordingly.

Condition Read more


celwell
Share my photo blog
  • 5792
  • photos
  • 0
  • videos